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Wednesday, December 13, 2017

How fires are changing the tundra’s face

Climate change takes a heavy toll on the tundra, increasing the probability of extreme droughts. As a result, the frequency of fires in forests, bogs and even wetlands continues to rise. In addition, the northern areas of the tundra have also become more accessible and negatively impacted by human activities in recent years.

Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Engineers have developed a realistic proposition for creating a water cloak that moves water around an object by applying forces on dissolved ions through a carefully designed electromagnetic field.

How do you track a secretive hawk? Follow the isotopes

A study has found that the rare Henst's goshawk of Madagascar hunts lemurs in low-lying areas that are most at risk to deforestation. Researchers could use this isotope analysis to study the habitat and prey needs of other threatened species that are difficult to track.

Single-dose vaccine could provide faster protection in cholera epidemics

Each year there are more than three million cases of cholera worldwide. Research now shows that giving a stronger single-dose of a live oral vaccine could be an effective tool in controlling outbreaks more quickly.

Producing hydrogen from methane in a cleaner, cheaper way

A ceramic membrane makes it possible to produce compressed hydrogen from methane with near-zero energy loss.

Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration, ion transport into cells

Nanometer-scale pores etched into layers of graphene can provide a simple model for the complex operation of ion channels, researchers have demonstrated.

Sandy claws: Like holiday enthusiasts, majoid crabs decorate their shells

Majoid crabs -- known as decorator crabs -- adorn themselves with items secured from their surroundings such as sponges, algae and other marine debris. Scientists are exploring what factors drive this behavior.

Guiding decisions about Spirit Lake and Toutle River at Mount St. Helens

A new report offers a framework to guide federal, tribal, state and local agencies, community groups, and other interested and affected parties in making decisions about the Spirit Lake and Toutle River system, near Mount St. Helens in southwest Washington state. The process should include broader participation by groups and parties whose safety, livelihoods, and quality of life are affected by decisions about the lake and river system, the report says.

Extreme fieldwork, climate modeling yields new insight into predicting Greenland’s melt

A new study brings together scientists from land hydrology, glaciology and climate modeling to unravel a meltwater mystery. Researchers discovered that some meltwater from the lakes and rivers atop the region's glaciers, is being stored and trapped on top of the glacier inside a low-density, porous 'rotten ice.' This phenomenon affects climate model predictions of Greenland's meltwater.

Many more bacteria have electrically conducting filaments

The microbiologists who have discovered electrically conducting microfilaments or 'nanowires' in the bacterium Geobacter, announce in a new article that they have discovered the unexpected structures in many other species, greatly broadening the research field on electrically conducting filaments.

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Window falls off U.S. military copter, injures child at school

Second such incident involving American helicopter in a week could fuel opposition to U.S. military presence in Japan

Roy Moore defeat: Democrat Doug Jones wins in Alabama Senate upset

Doug Jones wins a Senate seat for Alabama after a bitter campaign against Trump-backed Roy Moore. Source: BBC

Rebellion threat to EU Withdrawal Bill

Rebel MPs line up behind an amendment to guarantee Parliament a vote on the final Brexit deal. Source: BBC