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Sunday, June 25, 2017

Scientists recreate Californian Indian water bottles to study ancient exposure to chemicals

Water bottles replicated in the traditional method used by Native Californian Indians reveal that the manufacturing process may have been detrimental to the health of these people.

Sweet bribes for ants are key to crops bearing fruit, study shows

Some flowering crops, such as beans and cotton, carefully manage the amount and sweetness of nectar produced on their flowers and leaves, to recruit colonizing ants which deter herbivores. This strategy balances their needs for defense and reproduction.

Scientists work to develop heat-resistant ‘cow of the future’

More than half the cattle in the world live in hot and humid environments, including about 40 percent of beef cows in the United States. By using genomic tools, researchers aim to produce an animal with superior ability to adapt to hot living conditions and produce top-quality beef.

Tropical viruses: Coming soon to Europe?

The mosquito-borne viral disease Chikungunya is usually found in tropical areas. Researchers have now discovered how climate change is facilitating the spread of the Chikungunya virus. Even if climate change only progresses moderately – as scientists are currently observing – the risk of infection will continue to increase in many regions of the world through the end of the 21st century. If climate change continues unchecked, the virus could even spread to southern Europe and the United States.

How eggs got their shapes

The evolution of the amniotic egg -- complete with membrane and shell -- was key to vertebrates leaving the oceans and colonizing the land and air but how bird eggs evolved into so many different shapes and sizes has long been a mystery. Now, an international team of scientists took a quantitative approach to that question and found that adaptations for flight may have been critical drivers of egg-shape variation in birds.

Catalyst mimics the z-scheme of photosynthesis

A new study demonstrates a process with great potential for developing technologies for reducing CO2 levels.

Previously unknown pine marten diversity discovered

The elusive American pine marten, a little-studied member of the weasel family, might be more diverse than originally thought, according to new research.

Can animal diet mitigate greenhouse emissions?

The inclusion of agroindustrial by-products in pig feed can reduce the nitrous oxide emissions (N2O) of the slurry used as manures up to 65%, suggests new research.

Dogs to sniff out chemicals that identify human remains

New research to help improve accuracy of criminal investigations involves a partnership between humans and their canine coworkers.

Pathogen that causes sleeping sickness: Promising new target

The life-threatening African trypanosomiasis, also called sleeping sickness, is caused by protozoa of the species Trypanosoma brucei. A team of researchers has studied the pathogens and reported exciting news: The trypanosomes have a so far unknown enzyme which does not exist in humans and other vertebrates. This makes it a promising target for therapy.

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Cristina Kirchner se apunta como precandidata al Senado en Argentina

Cristina Fernández de Kirchner será precandidata al Senado en la provincia de Buenos Aires por el frente Unidad Ciudadana, informó la agencia de noticias Télam. Fuente: Cnnenespanol.com

Six hurt after car hits people

A woman is arrested after a car hits people marking the end of Ramadan in Newcastle. Source: BBC

Brexit: David Davis ‘pretty sure’ of free trade deal

The Brexit secretary also backs Theresa May and agrees a leadership contest would be "catastrophic". Source: BBC