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Wednesday, November 21, 2018

A Trojan horse delivery method for miRNA-enriched extracellular vesicles

A method for large-scale production of extracellular vesicles enriched with specific microRNAs (miRNAs) has been developed, offering a manufacturing standardization process which may have therapeutic applications and clinical impact.

Move over Rover: There’s a new sniffing powerhouse in the neighborhood

Scientists are now homing in on the secrets behind animals' super sniffers to develop an artificial chemical sensor that could be used for a variety of tasks, from food safety to national security.

The ‘Swiss Army knife of prehistoric tools’ found in Asia, suggests homegrown technology

A study by an international team of researchers have determines that carved stone tools, also known as Levallois cores, were used in Asia 80,000 to 170,000 years ago. With the find -- and absent human fossils linking the tools to migrating populations -- researchers believe people in Asia developed the technology independently, evidence of similar sets of skills evolving throughout different parts of the ancient world.

Jumping genes shed light on how advanced life may have emerged

A previously unappreciated interaction in the genome turns out to have possibly been one of the driving forces in the emergence of advanced life. This discovery began with a curiosity for retrotransposons, known as ''jumping genes,'' which are DNA sequences that copy and paste themselves within the genome, multiplying rapidly. Researchers inserted a retrotransposon into bacteria, and the results could give depth to the history of how advanced life may have emerged billions of years ago.

Scientists explain how wombats drop cubed feces

How do wombats produce cube-shaped feces? Scientists have investigated the hydrodynamics of fluids, including blood, processed food and urine, in the bodies of animals. She was curious how the differences in wombats' digestive processes and soft tissue structures might explain their oddly shaped scat.

New treatment to protect people with peanut allergies ready for FDA review

Medical researchers have developed a new treatment for protection against accidental exposure to peanut.

Geneticist solves long-standing finch beak mystery

Biologist have compared the genes of large-beaked Cameroonian finches to those of their smaller-beaked counterparts, found the answer to a 20-year old mystery: 300,000 base pairs, apparently inherited as a unit, always varied between them, and right in the middle of that genetic sequence was the well-known growth factor, IGF-1.

Selling plants on Amazon: A forest of untapped opportunity

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which horticultural businesses were directly selling live plant products online, either through Amazon, Ebay, or from their own websites.

Dodging antibiotic resistance by curbing bacterial evolution

Lowering mutation rates in harmful bacteria might be an as yet untried way to hinder the emergence of antimicrobial pathogens. One target for drug development might be a protein factor, DNA translocase Mfd, that enables bacteria to evolve rapidly by promoting mutations in many different bacterial species. This action speeds antibiotic resistance, including multi-drug resistance. Working on drugs to block Mfd and similar factors could be a revolutionary strategy to address the worldwide crisis of treatment-resistant infectious diseases.

Communal rearing gives mice a competitive edge

Scientists suggest that being raised communally makes mice more competitive when they're older. It is well known that in many animals, including humans, early-life experiences have long-lasting effects on the development of behaviors later in life. Researchers have investigated the effects of communal rearing on competitive and exploratory behaviors in adult male house mice.

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Lawmakers denounce Trump’s backing of Saudis, despite Khashoggi killing

Republicans and Democrats condemned Trump's decision to stand by Saudi Arabia, despite CIA's assessment of the Saudi journalist's murder

Trump backs Saudi Arabia despite killing of journalist

President Trump issued a statement standing by the U.S. alliance with Saudi Arabia despite the CIA's assessment that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. CBS News political correspondent Ed O'Keefe joins CBSN with more.

Trump defends Saudi Arabia ties despite Khashoggi murder

The president points to Saudi investments in the US amid anger over writer Jamal Khashoggi's murder. Source: BBC