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Wednesday, June 28, 2017

How are long strands of DNA packed into tiny cells?

Scientists are a step closer to understanding how our DNA is squeezed into every cell in the body. They provide the first-ever detailed picture of the nucleosome, the most basic building block of chromosomes (the structures that house our DNA). This finding will inform research on all processes that involve chromosomes, such as gene expression and DNA repair, which are critical to the understanding of diseases such as cancer.

Directed gene-copy variation: The key to conquering new environments

A study of yeast reveals new mechanism that allows cells to adapt to environmental changes more rapidly by accelerating genetic changes around genes that boost fitness.

Biologist looks at butterflies to help solve human infertility

A biologist helps decode the structural complexities of male butterfly ejaculate and co-evolving female reproductive tract. Findings from these biochemical relationships may help unlock certain mysteries of human infertility.

Lake harvests are likely more fruitful than we knew

Harvests from freshwater fisheries such as the Great Lakes could total more than 12 million tons a year globally and contribute more to global food supplies and economies than previous estimates indicate, according to a study.

Could humans ever regenerate a heart? A new study suggests the answer is ‘yes’

A new study's findings point to potential for tweaking communication between human genes and advancing our ability to treat heart conditions and stimulate regenerative healing.

Could this strategy bring high-speed communications to the deep sea?

A new strategy for sending acoustic waves through water could potentially open up the world of high-speed communications to divers, marine research vessels, remote ocean monitors, deep sea robots, and submarines. By taking advantage of the dynamic rotation generated as the acoustic wave travels, also known as its orbital angular momentum, researchers were able to pack more channels onto a single frequency, effectively increasing the amount of information capable of being transmitted.

Collapse of European ice sheet caused chaos in past

Scientists have reconstructed in detail the collapse of the Eurasian ice sheet at the end of the last ice age. The big melt wreaked havoc across the European continent, driving home the original Brexit 10,000 years ago.

Genes, ozone, and autism

Exposure to ozone in the environment puts individuals with high levels of genetic variation at an even higher risk for developing autism than would be expected just by adding the two risk factors together, a new analysis shows. The study is the first to look at the combined effects of genome-wide genetic change and environmental risk factors for autism.

Fungal toxins easily become airborne, creating potential indoor health risk

Toxins produced by three different species of fungus growing indoors on wallpaper may become aerosolized, and easily inhaled. The findings likely have implications for 'sick building syndrome.

Scientists recreate Californian Indian water bottles to study ancient exposure to chemicals

Water bottles replicated in the traditional method used by Native Californian Indians reveal that the manufacturing process may have been detrimental to the health of these people.

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Pope Francis rejects “martyr” label for suicide bombers

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Ex-diplomat on why Putin aims to “chip away at American influence”

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Public sector pay cap under review, No 10 suggests

Ministers hint the 1% limit could be lifted as a Labour move to scrap it is defeated in Parliament. Source: BBC