Migrating mule deer don’t need directions, study finds

Mule deer navigate in spring and fall mostly by using their knowledge of past migration routes and seasonal ranges, according to a new study.

A single gene determines whether a fly has a good sense of sight or...

Trade-offs in the sizes of visual and olfactory organs are a common feature of animal evolution, but the underlying genetic and developmental mechanisms have not been clear. A study reveals that a single DNA variant that affects the timing of sensory organ development in fruit flies could explain the size trade-off between eyes and antennae, potentially providing a quick route to behavioral changes and adaptation.

Genes tell the story of how the Asian tiger mosquito spread

Over the last 40 years, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has invaded every continent thanks to the transportation of its eggs via human trade and transportation. Researchers have now used the genomes of the mosquitoes to track the history of the invasion and expansion of the species through Albania, Italy, and Greece.

Memory T cells shelter in bone marrow, boosting immunity in mice with restricted diets

Even when taking in fewer calories and nutrients, humans and other mammals usually remain protected against infectious diseases they have already encountered. This may be because memory T cells, which are located throughout the body and required to maintain immune responses to infectious agents. A new study in mice also found that animals undergoing dietary restriction were better protected against tumors and bacterial infections than animals with unrestricted diets.

Are we really protecting rivers from pollution? It’s hard to say, and that’s a...

More public and private resources than ever are being directed to protecting and preserving aquatic ecosystems and watersheds. Whether mandated for land development, farming or in response to the growing severity and number of natural disasters - scientists found evidence that decades of watershed restoration and mitigation projects have taken place, but their impact is mostly perceived; data is relatively undocumented -- or simply missing.

New light on contested identity of medieval skeleton found at Prague Castle

Used as a propaganda tool by the Nazis and Soviets during the Second World War and Cold War, the remains of a 10th century male, unearthed beneath Prague Castle in 1928, have been the subject of continued debate and archaeological manipulation.

Explaining earthquakes we can’t feel

Researchers have explained mysterious slow-moving earthquakes known as slow slip events with the help of computer simulations. The answer, they learned, is in rocks' pores.

Federal Green Challenge Winners in the Pacific Northwest Save Taxpayers’ Money and Promote Efficiency

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is recognizing federal facilities in the Pacific Northwest and nationwide for conserving resources and saving taxpayers’ money as part of the Federal Green Challenge.

Separate polarization and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators

Fiddler crabs see the polarization of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or a predator. Now researchers have begun to unravel how this information is processed within the crab's brain. The study has discovered that when detecting approaching objects, fiddler crabs separate polarization and brightness information.

Extreme wildfires threaten to turn boreal forests from carbon sinks to carbon sources

A research team investigated the impact of extreme fires on previously intact carbon stores by studying the soil and vegetation of the boreal forest and how they changed after a record-setting fire season in the Northwest Territories in 2014. They collected 200 soil samples and used radiocarbon dating to estimate the carbon age. They found combustion of legacy carbon in nearly half of the samples taken from young forests (less than 60 years old).

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El príncipe Andrés insiste en que nunca presenció o sospechó el comportamiento de Epstein

"Su suicidio ha dejado muchas preguntas sin respuesta y reconozco y simpatizo con todos los que han sido afectados", dijo el príncipe Andrés sobre Jeffrey Epstein. Fuente: Cnnenespanol.com

The Dish: Chef Anya Fernald shares her signature recipes

Including sausage, chimichurri, and roasted baby carrots

Unpiloted Soyuz spacecraft aborts space station docking

Russian flight controllers hope to make a second docking attempt after troubleshooting