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Friday, October 19, 2018

150-million-year old, piranha-like specimen is earliest known flesh-eating fish

Researchers have described a remarkable new species of fish that lived in the sea about 150 million years ago in the time of the dinosaurs. The new species of bony fish had teeth like a piranha, which the researchers suggest they used as piranhas do: to bite off chunks of flesh from other fish.

Infection biology: Staying a step ahead of the game

Trypanosoma brucei, which causes sleeping sickness, evades the immune system by repeatedly altering the structure of its surface coat. Sequencing of its genome and studies of its 3D genome architecture have now revealed crucial molecular aspects of this strategy.

Climate stress will make cities more vulnerable

The fall of Angkor has long puzzled historians, archaeologists and scientists, but now a research team is one step closer to discovering what led to the city's demise -- and it comes with a warning for modern urban communities.

Did eating starchy foods give humans an evolutionary advantage?

Gene AMY1, which kickstarts digestion of starch in the mouth, is associated with blood glucose levels and digestion of carbohydrates, with implications for understanding human evolutionary biology and the gut microbiome.

Wind farms and reducing hurricane precipitation

New research reveals an unexpected benefit of large-scale offshore wind farms: the ability to lessen precipitation from hurricanes.

Massive organism is crashing on our watch

Researchers have conducted the first complete assessment of the Pando aspen clone and the results show continuing deterioration of this 'forest of one tree.' While a portion of the famed grove is recovery nicely as a result of previous restoration, the majority of Pando (Latin for 'I Spread') is diminishing by attrition.

Life on the floor of the Arctic Ocean, with rigor and in detail

In an extensive and rigorous study of animal life on the Central Arctic Ocean floor, researchers have shown that water depth and food availability influence the species composition, density, and biomass of benthic communities.

Sex or food? Decision-making in single-cell organisms

Unicellular diatoms are able to adapt their behavior to different external stimuli based on an evaluation of their own needs. In experiments, Seminavis robusta diatoms directed their orientation either towards nutrient sources or mating partners, depending on the degree of starvation and the need to mate.

New understanding of Mekong River incision

An international team of earth scientists has linked the establishment of the Mekong River to a period of major intensification of the Asian monsoon during the middle Miocene, about 17 million years ago, findings that supplant the assumption that the river incised in response to tectonic causes.

New method to address deep-seated biases in science

A new statistical method that tests for equivalence, rather than difference, has a role to play in dismantling gender and publication biases in science. The authors believe the technique has broad applicability across disciplines and can help remove publication bias against ''negative results,'' opening the door to a broader investigation of natural phenomena.

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With no proof, Trump accuses Democrats of supporting migrant caravan

At a rally in Missoula, Montana, the president accused Democrats – without evidence – of supporting a caravan of about 3,000 migrants heading for the U.S. border. The president threatens to mobilize the U.S. military and shut down the southern border to stop those migrants from entering the U.S. Chip Reid reports.

If Turkey has proof Khashoggi was killed, it’s apparently not sharing

Hours after Mike Pompeo refutes claim he's heard audio of Jamal Khashoggi's alleged murdered, Turkey backs him up, but keeps its secret

Turkey says it hasn’t shared any audio of alleged Khashoggi murder

Turkey's top diplomat confirms his government has not given the U.S. any recordings of the alleged murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had already denied hearing tapes or seeing transcripts. President Trump moved closer to acknowledging the Saudis may have played a role. Weijia Jiang reports.