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Thursday, October 19, 2017

New gene catalog of ocean microbiome reveals surprises

Oceanographers report completing the largest single-site microbiome gene catalog constructed to date. With this new information, the team discovered nutrient limitation is a central driver in the evolution of ocean microbe genomes.

Sea ice hit record lows in November

Unusually high air temperatures and a warm ocean have led to a record low Arctic sea ice extent for November, according to scientists. In the Southern Hemisphere, Antarctic sea ice extent also hit a record low for the month, caused by moderately warm temperatures and a rapid shift in circumpolar winds.

Game theory research reveals fragility of common resources

People are naturally predisposed to over-use "common-pool resources" such as transportation systems and fisheries even if it risks failure of the system, to the detriment of society as a whole, new research in game theory shows.

Rising ocean temperatures impacting human health

Rising sea surface temperatures are causing marine-related tropical diseases and harmful algal blooms to spread towards the poles, a shift that is impacting human health, according to a chapter from a new report.

Improving Lake Erie’s water quality

The conditions in Lake Erie continue to pose several health risks to Ohioans in coastal communities, making it difficult to maintain good water quality for citizens, state and local policymakers. Researchers in the Great Lakes region are now working toward innovative solutions.

Cracking the code of a deadly virus

Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an unforgiving killer of horses, donkeys and zebras, resulting in mortality as high as 80 percent of infected animals. It causes rapid, catastrophic swelling of the brain and spinal cord, leading to severe neurological symptoms and—in many cases—sudden death. The virus can also infect humans, with similar results. Now a research team has exploited a weakness in VEEV's genetic code, resulting in a far less deadly mutant version of the virus when tested in laboratory mice.

From plant odorant detection to sex pheromone communication

Biologists are now able to show that the receptors enabling the primitive moth species, Eriocrania semipurpurella, find an individual of the opposite sex, probably evolved from receptors which help the moth perceive the fragrances of plants.

Discovery of chromosome motor supports DNA loop extrusion

It is one of the mysteries in biology: how does a cell neatly distribute its replicated DNA between two daughter cells? Scientists are split into two camps: the first argues that condensing works like a hook, tying DNA together. The other camp thinks that the ring-shaped protein pulls the DNA inwards to create a loop. Now researchers from give the 'loop-extrustion camp' a boost: condensin does indeed have the putative 'motor power' on board.

Eating your greens could enhance sport performance

Nitrate supplementation in conjunction with Sprint Interval Training in low oxygen conditions could enhance sport performance a study has found.

Sunlight and ‘right’ microbes convert Arctic carbon into carbon dioxide

A new study outlines the mechanisms and points to the importance of both sunlight and the right microbial community as keys to converting permafrost carbon to CO2.

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Brexit: May offers more assurances to EU nationals

Ahead of a key summit, Theresa May vows to make it as easy as possible for them to stay in the UK. Source: BBC

“Cada día me aseguraban que me iban a matar. Y me decían cómo”: el...

Maxim Lapunov dice que pasó 12 días en una celda, golpeado, amenazado y humillado por la policía. Este es el primer testimonio de víctimas de una persecución a hombres homosexuales que reportan grupos de activistas en la república del Cáucaso. Fuente: bbcmundo.com

Rohingya crisis: Refugees tell of ‘house by house’ killings

Refugees continue to pour into Bangladesh, adding to the world's fastest-growing humanitarian crisis. Source: BBC