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Sunday, January 20, 2019

Rainbow colors reveal cell history

A system called "Beta-bow", which allows the history of beta-cells to be traced by genetic bar-coding and multicolor imaging, has been developed by researchers.

Party discipline for jumping genes

Jumping genes, transposons, are part of the genome of most organisms, aggregated into families and can damage the genome by jumping. How hosts suppress the jumping is well investigated. Why they still can jump has hardly been understood so far. Researchers investigated for the first time in all transposons of the host organism, which properties and host environments facilitate jumping. They showed that family affiliation is more important than position.

Artificial orchid cultivation kit

Orchids are loved by gardeners around the world but are notoriously difficult to cultivate. Researchers have developed a new orchid cultivation kit and have succeeded in complete artificial cultivation of an autonomous orchid. Since this kit can be made cheaply, it can broaden the opportunities for orchid cultivation in general households. It is also expected to be useful in preserving the genetic diversity of orchidaceous plants, many of which are in danger of extinction.

Ozark grasslands experience major increase in trees and shrubs

Woody vegetation, such as trees and shrubs, has increased dramatically in Ozark grasslands over the past 75 years, according to a study. If these ecosystems continue to favor woody vegetation, will it be possible to maintain open grasslands for the foreseeable future?

Into more thin air: Exploring the adaptation extremes of human high altitude sickness and...

Many research groups have explored human adaptation to high altitude living among three major far-flung global populations: Tibetans, Ethiopians and Peruvians. But few have simultaneously explored the other extreme---maladaptation----in the form of chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Now, in the largest whole genome study of its kind, an international research team led by University of California San Diego's Chairman of Pediatrics, Dr. Gabriel Haddad, has expanded on their recent study of understanding both adaptation extremes in a Peruvian population.

Ancient DNA data fills in thousands of years of human prehistory in Africa

By sequencing the ancient genomes of 15 individuals from different parts of Africa, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on Sept. 21 have reconstructed the prehistory of humans on the continent, going back thousands of years. The findings shed light on which human populations lived in eastern and southern Africa between 8,000 and 1,000 years ago, the researchers say.

Scientists sequence asexual tiny worm whose lineage stretches back 18 million years

A team of scientists has sequenced, for the first time, a tiny worm that belongs to a group of exclusively asexual species that originated approximately 18 million years ago -- making it one of the oldest living lineages of asexual animals known.

Green algae could hold clues for engineering faster-growing crops

Two new studies provide a detailed look at an essential part of algae's growth machinery, with the eventual goal of applying this knowledge to improving the growth of crops.

Jellyfish, with no brains, still seem to sleep

The discovery that primitive jellyfish sleep suggests that sleep is an ancient, evolutionarily conserved behavior.

Efforts to save sea turtles are a ‘global conservation success story’

A new study of the world's seven sea turtle species provides evidence that their numbers are growing overall (unlike many endangered vertebrates), thanks to years of conservation efforts that have played a key role in sea turtle recovery -- even for small sea turtle populations.

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Almanac: The “Chunnel”

On January 20, 1986, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and French President Francois Mitterand broke new ground on the long-dreamed-of tunnel connecting England and France. Jane Pauley reports.

Almanac: The English Channel Tunnel

On January 20, 1986, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and French President Francois Mitterand broke new ground on the long-dreamed-of "Chunnel"

Downing Street warns MPs not to block Brexit

No 10 responds as two groups of MPs seek to take control of the UK's withdrawal from the EU. Source: BBC