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Thursday, June 21, 2018

Primates in peril

Primates are fascinating. They are intelligent, live in complex societies and are a vital part of the ecosystem. Lemurs, lorises, galagos, tarsiers, monkeys and apes are our closest biological relatives and just like them, humans are also primates. However, while the human population spread to all corners of the earth, many of our closest relatives are under serious threat.

Orange, tea tree and eucalyptus oils sweeten diesel fumes

Waste oil from orange, tea tree and eucalyptus essential oil production mixed with diesel provides a sweet-smelling biofuel blend with comparable performance to diesel-only fuel.

Quality of diet still poor for SNAP participants

A new study finds persistent nutritional disparities within the food choices of those receiving assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) compared to those not receiving SNAP assistance.

Genetic engineering researcher: Politicians are deaf to people’s ethical concerns

A new study reports that political discussions about genetically modified foods have ignored concerns among Danes that GM foods are 'unnatural'.

Meat sensitivity spread by ticks linked to heart disease

Researchers have linked sensitivity to an allergen in red meat -- a sensitivity spread by tick bites -- with a buildup of fatty plaque in the arteries of the heart. This buildup may increase the risk of heart attacks and stroke.

New method makes weather forecasts right as rain

Meteorologists have known for some time that rainfall forecasts have flaws, as failure to take into account factors such as evaporation can affect their accuracy. Now, researchers have developed a system that improves the precision of forecasts by accounting for evaporation in rainfall estimates, particularly for locations 30 miles or more from the nearest National Weather Service radar.

Leading Antarctic experts offer two possible views of continent’s future

The next 10 years will be critical for the future of Antarctica, and choices made will have long-lasting consequences, says an international group of Antarctic research scientists. It lays out two different plausible future scenarios for the continent and its Southern Ocean over the next 50 years.

Flying spiders sense meteorological conditions, use nanoscale fibers to float on the wind

Spiders take flight on the smallest of breezes by first sensing the wind, and then spinning out dozens of nanoscale fibers up to seven meters long, according to a new study.

Foods combining fats and carbohydrates more rewarding than foods with just fats or carbs

Researchers show that the reward center of the brain values foods high in both fat and carbohydrates -- i.e., many processed foods -- more than foods containing only fat or only carbs. A study of 206 adults supports the idea that these kinds of foods hijack our body's inborn signals governing food consumption.

AI-driven ultrafast technology visually identifies cells without images

A team made of a scientific start-up company and academic researchers has invented a new cell identification and sorting system called Ghost Cytometry. The system combines a novel imaging technique with artificial intelligence to identify and sort cells with unprecedented high-throughput speed. The scientists leading the project hope that their method will be used to identify and sort cancer cells circulating in patients' blood, enable faster drug discovery, and improve the quality of cell-based medicine.

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Burger King pulls ad urging sex with World Cup stars

Fast food chain admits ad urging Russian women to procreate with soccer stars, "turned out to be too offensive"

Japan suspends missile strike drills after Trump-Kim summit

Started last year as N. Korea test-fired missiles near Japanese islands, drills now on hold as gov't says threat has eased

Mass murderer’s appeal to human rights court rejected

Anders Behring Breivik, serving 21 years for killing 77 people in bomb, shooting rampage, said prison isolation violated his rights