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Saturday, February 24, 2018

Listening to data could be the best way to track salmon migration

Sound could be the key to understanding ecological data: in a new study, researchers have turned chemical data that shows salmon migration patterns into sound, helping people hear when they move towards the ocean from one river to another. The approach - called sonification - enables even untrained listeners to interpret large amounts of complex data, providing an easier way to interpret 'big data.'

‘Chameleon’ ocean bacteria can shift their colors

Cyanobacteria -- which propel the ocean engine and help sustain marine life -- can shift their color like chameleons to match different colored light across the world's seas, according to new research.

Zika virus could help combat brain cancer

Researchers show that infection by Zika caused death of cells from glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive kind of malignant brain tumor in adults. Scientists foresee the use of genetic engineering to neutralize Zika virus' infectious whilst preserving the viral particles which induce the death of tumoral cells.

Scientists poised to win the race against rust disease and beyond

In a race to prevent and control rust disease epidemics, scientists have positioned themselves to better understand how rust fungi infect crops and evolve virulence.

Designing microbial communities to help plants battle nutritional stress

Plants and microbes engage in a diverse array of symbiotic relationships, but identifying the specific microbes or groups of microbes that contribute to plant health is extremely difficult. Researchers have devised a general experimental scheme to identify and predict which small groups of bacterial species can help plants respond to phosphate starvation, a form of nutritional stress.

Spare parts from small parts: Novel scaffolds to grow muscle

Australian biomedical engineers have developed a 3-D material that successfully mimics nature to transform cells into muscle.

Pausing evolution makes bioproduction of chemicals affordable and efficient

Circumventing evolution in cell factories can pave the way for commercializing new biobased chemicals to large-scale.

In living color: Brightly-colored bacteria could be used to ‘grow’ paints and coatings

Researchers have unlocked the genetic code behind some of the brightest and most vibrant colors in nature. The article is the first study of the genetics of structural color -- as seen in butterfly wings and peacock feathers -- and paves the way for genetic research in a variety of structurally colored organisms.

Biodiversity loss raises risk of ‘extinction cascades’

New research shows that the loss of biodiversity can increase the risk of 'extinction cascades', where an initial species loss leads to a domino effect of further extinctions.

Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering

Honeybees gathering nectar inspired an algorithm that eased the burden of host servers handling unpredictable traffic by about 25 percent. Nature can inspire some great engineering, but it can also lead to some flops. Take slime mold: Standard algorithms beat it hands down to model connectivity.

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Syria war: UN Security Council approves 30-day ceasefire

Some of the biggest jihadist rebel groups, and their associates, are not covered by the truce. Source: BBC

Vicar of Dibley actress Emma Chambers dies aged 53

Dawn French and Hugh Grant among co-stars to pay tribute to the "loving" Vicar of Dibley actress. Source: BBC

La Casa Blanca acuerda divulgar el memo demócrata

La Comisión de Inteligencia de la Cámara de Representantes dio a conocer el sábado un memorando demócrata en forma redactada que busca refutar las acusaciones republicanas sobre abusos en la vigilancia realizada por el FBI Fuente: Cnnenespanol.com