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Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Water vapor sets some oxides aflutter

A team of scientists has discovered a phenomenon that could have practical applications in solar cells, rechargeable battery electrodes, and water-splitting devices.

Researchers watch biomolecules at work

Scientists have succeeded in observing an important cell protein at work. To do this, they used a method that allows to measure structural changes within complex molecules. The further developed procedure makes it possible to elucidate such processes in the cell, i.e. in the natural environment. The researchers are also providing a tool kit, which allows a wide range of molecules to be measured.

Availability of nitrogen to plants is declining as climate warms

Researchers have found that global changes, including warming temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are causing a decrease in the availability of a key nutrient for terrestrial plants. This could affect the ability of forests to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and reduce the amount of nutrients available for the creatures that eat them.

Genomic tools to combat the spread of the invasive Asian longhorned beetle

The Asian longhorned beetle, also known as the starry sky beetle, is native to eastern Asia but has successfully invaded North America and Europe where it infests maple, birch, willow, elm, and poplar trees. An international team of scientists report on the sequencing, annotation, and comparative exploration of this beetle's genome in an effort to develop novel tools to combat its spread and better understand the biology of invasive wood-boring pests.

How your diet can influence your environmental impact

The impact of our dietary choices on the global phosphorus footprint shouldn't be neglected, recent research shows. A shift towards a plant-based diet may be an undervalued solution toward decreasing our environmental impact and attaining phosphorus sustainability, suggest researchers.

World’s longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light

In 2009, the world's largest dinosaur tracks were discovered in the French village of Plagne, in the Jura Mountains. Since then, a series of excavations at the site has uncovered other tracks, sprawling over more than 150 meters. They form the longest sauropod trackway ever to be found. Scientists have concluded these tracks were left 150 million years ago by a dinosaur at least 35 m long and weighing no less than 35 tons.

Current weak spots in Greenland’s ice sheet have been weak for thousands of years

Earlier recent work has shown that the east, southeast and northwest regions of the Greenland ice sheet have contributed to 77% of the total mass loss over the last century. Now, researchers have used GPS data to show that the east, southeast and northwest also contributed significantly to ice mass loss in the past, over thousands of years: about 40% of the total loss of ice mass.

Remote sensing data reveals hundreds more species at risk of extinction

Existing assessments of extinction risk would benefit from modern geospatial technologies, say scientists, who warn that there are hundreds more species who are at risk of extinction than is currently recognized.

Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems

Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems.

Here’s how viruses inactivate the immune system, causing cancer

It's no new news that viruses cause cancer. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV) causes almost all of the more than 500,000 annual worldwide cases of cervical cancer. This makes sense: By driving the proliferation of infected cells, viruses speed manufacture of more viruses, but excessive cellular proliferation is also a hallmark of cancer. Now a new review explores another strategy that viruses use to ensure their own survival, also with the unfortunate byproduct of promoting cancer, namely the viral ability to manipulate the human immune system. This new understanding may help to increase the effectiveness of immune-based therapies against cancer.

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Lawmakers denounce Trump’s backing of Saudis, despite Khashoggi killing

Republicans and Democrats condemned Trump's decision to stand by Saudi Arabia, despite CIA's assessment of the Saudi journalist's murder

Trump backs Saudi Arabia despite killing of journalist

President Trump issued a statement standing by the U.S. alliance with Saudi Arabia despite the CIA's assessment that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. CBS News political correspondent Ed O'Keefe joins CBSN with more.

Trump defends Saudi Arabia ties despite Khashoggi murder

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