22 C
Santiago, CL
Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Living computers: RNA circuits transform cells into nanodevices

Scientists have demonstrated how living cells can be induced to carry out computations in the manner of tiny robots or computers.

How plant architectures mimic subway networks

3-D laser scanning has been used to understand how plants optimize their growth, explains a new report.

Mediterranean-style diets linked to better brain function in older adults

Eating foods included in two healthy diets -- the Mediterranean or the MIND diet -- is linked to a lower risk for memory difficulties in older adults, according to a new study.

Could spraying particles into marine clouds help cool the planet?

A first test of humans' ability to modify clouds would help explain the behavior of clouds and aerosols, while also testing a possible future climate emergency measure.

New shark species glows in the dark, weighs about 2 pounds and has a...

Just as "Shark Week" is gearing up, researchers have discovered a new species of shark 17 years in the making. Like finding a needle in a haystack, it was well worth the wait as this elusive creature is yet to be seen in the wild.

Biological pest management: Infected insects cause a stink

Researchers have shown how nematodes use smell to seek out uninfected insects, which they then enter and kill. The findings support the group's long-term goal of improving how gardeners and the agricultural industry use nematodes in biological pest management.

Algae cultivation technique could advance biofuels

Washington State University researchers have developed a way to grow algae more efficiently -- in days instead of weeks -- and make the algae more viable for several industries, including biofuels.

Summer sea ice melt in the Arctic

Earlier this year Arctic sea ice sank to a record low wintertime extent for the third straight year. Now NASA is flying a set of instruments north of Greenland to observe the impact of the melt season on the Arctic's oldest and thickest sea ice.

Optimization for self-production may explain mysterious features of the ribosome

A new study explains the previously mysterious characteristics of ribosomes, the protein production factories of the cell. Researchers mathematically demonstrated that ribosomes are precisely structured to build themselves as quickly as possible to support efficient cell growth.

Rush hour pollution may be more dangerous than you think

Everyone knows that exposure to pollution during rush hour traffic can be hazardous to your health, but it's even worse than previously thought. In-car measurements of pollutants that cause oxidative stress found exposure levels for drivers to be twice as high as previously believed.

Stay connected

- Advertisement -

Latest article

Urbanization changes shape of mosquitoes’ wings

Research shows that rapid urbanization in São Paulo City, Brazil, is influencing wing morphology in the mosquitoes that transmit dengue and malaria.

No-deal Brexit ‘means hard border’ – European Commission

No deal makes hard border obvious, says EC spokesman, but Irish government calls that unacceptable. Source: BBC

How sex pheromones diversify: Lessons from yeast

What happens to sex pheromones as new species emerge? New research studies sex pheromones in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, revealing an 'asymmetric' pheromone recognition system in which one pheromone operates extremely stringently whereas the other pheromone is free to undergo a certain degree of diversification, perhaps leading to a first step towards speciation.