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Monday, January 21, 2019

A chicken-egg question: Where do baby genes come from?

New genes are more likely to emerge full-fledged from a genome's 'junk' DNA than many scientists would have expected, according to new research by evolutionary biologists.

Tsunami formation: Study challenges long-held theory

A new study is challenging a long-held theory that tsunamis form and acquire their energy mostly from vertical movement of the seafloor.

Is climate change responsible for record-setting extreme weather events?

After an unusually intense heat wave, downpour or drought, climate scientists inevitably receive phone calls and emails asking whether human-caused climate change played a role.

With synthetic mucus, researchers take aim at antibiotic resistance

The human body produces about a gallon of mucus per day. By studying and replicating mucus’ natural ability to control pathogenic bacteria, scientists hope to find new methods for combatting infections and antibiotic resistance.

‘Unicorn’ shipworm could reveal clues about human medicine, bacterial infections

A dark slithering creature four feet long that dwells in the foul mud of a remote lagoon in the Philippines has been discovered by researchers. They say studying the animal, a giant shipworm with pinkish siphons at one end and an eyeless head at the other, could add to our understanding of how bacteria cause infections and, in turn, how we might adapt to tolerate--and even benefit from--them.

Solving a cell membrane mystery

Scientists have developed new fluorescent probes that prove the existence of cell membrane structures called ‘lipid rafts’, allowing researchers to study how toxins and viruses invade cells.

In-flight, on-demand hydrogen production could mean ‘greener’ aircraft

Technion researchers have a developed safe and efficient way to produce hydrogen on board a plane in flight. Using aluminum particles and (fresh or waste), the technology could one day help meet in-flight energy needs on commercial aircraft.

Gut bacteria may turn common nutrient into clot-enhancing compound

Gut bacteria can produce a clot-enhancing compound when people eat a nutrient found in a variety of foods including meat, eggs and milk, according to new research.

Photosynthesis in the dark? Unraveling the mystery of algae evolution

Researchers compared the photosynthetic regulation in glaucophytes with that in cyanobacteria, to elucidate the changes caused by symbiosis in the interaction between photosynthetic electron transfer and other metabolic pathways. Their findings suggest that cyanelles of the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa retain many of the characteristics observed in their ancestral bacteria, and that C. paradoxa is the primary symbiotic algae most similar to cyanobacteria than other lineages of photosynthetic organisms in terms of metabolic interactions.

Novel method to detect toxic effects of chemicals could reduce need for animal testing

Traditional toxicological investigations performed on animals (in vivo) are expensive, time-consuming and may cause animal suffering. But new research demonstrates that a neuronal cell model, derived from mouse, can be used to evaluate the neurotoxic effect of chemicals. The alternative toxicity risk assessment could reduce reliance on animal testing while also enable quick large scale toxicity evaluations.

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China economy: Fourth quarter growth slips to 6.4%

The figures reinforce concerns over the risk slowing growth in China poses to the global economy. Source: BBC

Explosión en ducto de Pemex: la desesperación de los familiares de las víctimas de...

Según los últimos reportes, 85 personas murieron y 54 permanecen hospitalizadas tras una explosión el viernes en una toma clandestina en Tlahuelilpan, en el estado de Hidalgo, en el centro del país. Fuente: bbcmundo.com

Courchevel: Two killed in fire at French ski resort

A large fire broke out in a building housing seasonal workers in a popular French Alpine resort. Source: BBC