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Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Marine fish won an evolutionary lottery 66 million years ago

Why do the Earth's oceans contain such a staggering diversity of fish of so many different sizes, shapes, colors and ecologies? The answer, biologists report, dates back 66 million years ago, when a six-mile-wide asteroid crashed to Earth, wiping out the dinosaurs and approximately 75 percent of animal and plant species worldwide.

Studying oxygen, scientists discover clues to recovery from mass extinction

A research team is helping to understand why the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event happened and why it took life so long to recover.

Warming climate could speed forest regrowth in eastern US

Warming climate could speed the natural regrowth of forests on undeveloped or abandoned land in the eastern United States, according to a new study. Previous research has shown that the succession from field to forest can happen decades sooner in the southeastern US than in the Northeast. But it wasn't obvious why. A new study points to temperature as the major factor influencing the pace of reforestation.

General aviation pilots struggle to interpret weather forecast and observation displays

When tested on their knowledge of 23 types of weather information, from icing forecasts and turbulence reports to radar, 204 general aviation (GA) pilots were stumped by about 42 percent of the questions. The findings are worrisome.

Scientists decipher the magma bodies under Yellowstone

Using supercomputer modeling, scientists have unveiled a new explanation for the geology underlying recent seismic imaging of magma bodies below Yellowstone National Park.

Extreme climate variability destabilizing West Coast ecosystems

Extreme climate variability over the last century in western North America may be destabilizing both marine and terrestrial ecosystems.

Evidence mounts for Alzheimer’s, suicide risks among youth in polluted cities

Researchers have published a new study that reveals increased risks for Alzheimer's and suicide among children and young adults living in polluted megacities.

Breakthrough brings gene-editing medicine one step closer to patient applications

Researchers have discovered a way to greatly improve the accuracy of gene-editing technology by replacing the natural guide molecule it uses with a synthetic one called a bridged nucleic acid, or BNA. The research promises to bring the technology much closer to therapeutic reality.

Newly identified bacteria may help bees nourish their young

Researchers have isolated three previously unknown bacterial species from wild bees and flowers. The bacteria, which belong to the genus Lactobacillus, may play a role in preserving the nectar and pollen that female bees store in their nests as food for their larvae.

Temperature affects insecticide efficacy against malaria vectors

Ambient temperature has a marked effect on the toxicity of the most commonly used insecticides for malaria control, according to a new study. The results underline the need to evaluate the efficacy of these chemicals under real field conditions.

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98-year-old woman agrees to be matron of honor for 23-year-old friend

When 98-year-old Naomi Wooten met 23-year-old Bethany Shaw in church, they became friends. But when Bethany asked Naomi to be her matron of honor, she didn't say yes right away. CBS News correspondent David Begnaud has the story of their friendship.

9 dead after van strikes crowd of pedestrians in Toronto — live updates

Van jumps onto sidewalk at busy intersection in Toronto, strikes down pedestrians; driver taken into custody Monday

Former President George H.W. Bush hospitalized

Former President George H.W. Bush was admitted to the hospital after contracting an infection that spread to his blood. His office said in a statement that he appears to be recovering.