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Friday, October 19, 2018

Goldilocks principle in biology: Fine-tuning the ‘just right’ signal load

In 'Goldilock and the Three Bears', Goldilock finds that only one bowl of porridge has the ''just right'' temperature, and in the same way within biology, you can find the 'just right' conditions -- called the Goldilocks principle. This a research team has done by demonstrating that in order to get the 'just right' amount of signalling for symbiosis in the roots of legumes, a specific enzyme called chitinase (CHIT5) must be present.

Tropical moths in the mountains are larger

Researchers have measured more than 19,000 tropical moths from 1,100 species to find out whether their size varies with elevation. The researchers found clear patterns: moths increase in size significantly at higher elevations.

Irrigating vegetables with wastewater in African cities may spread disease

Urban farmers growing vegetables to feed millions of people in Africa's ever-growing cities could unwittingly be helping to spread disease by irrigating crops with wastewater, a new study reveals.

‘Vampire burial’ reveals efforts to prevent child’s return from grave

Archaeologists found the remains of a 10-year-old child with a stone inserted into his or her mouth at a fifth-century Italian cemetery. They think the stone was meant to keep the child from rising from the dead and spreading malaria to the living.

Innovative tool allows continental-scale water, energy, and land system modeling

A new large-scale hydroeconomic model will allow researchers to study water systems across whole continents, looking at sustainability of supply and the impacts of water management on the energy and agricultural sectors.

Getting to the root of lavender’s secrets

A team of researchers has identified the complete genetic makeup of the lavender plant, Lavandula angustifolia.

Clues from a Somalian cavefish about modern mammals’ dark past

After millions of years living in darkness, a species of blind cavefish has lost an ancient system of DNA repair. That DNA repair system, found in organisms including bacteria, fungi, plants, and most other animals, harnesses energy from visible light to repair DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) light. The findings are intriguing in part because only placental mammals were previously known to lack this system.

Fruit fly protein could be new tool in tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes

An insulin-binding protein in fruit flies could provide new opportunities for tackling disease-carrying mosquitoes, such as malaria and yellow fever.

All eyes on Hurricane Michael

Hurricane Michael plowed into the Florida panhandle Wednesday, Oct. 10, as a major Category 4 storm -- the strongest hurricane ever to hit that region. Many NASA instruments are keeping tabs on Michael from space.

Nutrients may reduce blood glucose levels

One amino acid, alanine, may produce a short-term lowering of glucose levels by altering energy metabolism in the cell.

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With no proof, Trump accuses Democrats of supporting migrant caravan

At a rally in Missoula, Montana, the president accused Democrats – without evidence – of supporting a caravan of about 3,000 migrants heading for the U.S. border. The president threatens to mobilize the U.S. military and shut down the southern border to stop those migrants from entering the U.S. Chip Reid reports.

If Turkey has proof Khashoggi was killed, it’s apparently not sharing

Hours after Mike Pompeo refutes claim he's heard audio of Jamal Khashoggi's alleged murdered, Turkey backs him up, but keeps its secret

Turkey says it hasn’t shared any audio of alleged Khashoggi murder

Turkey's top diplomat confirms his government has not given the U.S. any recordings of the alleged murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had already denied hearing tapes or seeing transcripts. President Trump moved closer to acknowledging the Saudis may have played a role. Weijia Jiang reports.