Snake venom composition could be related to hormones and diet

Many people are afraid of snakes, but scientists are now revealing insights about their venoms that could give even ophidiophobes an appreciation for the animals. One team has found that the proteins from the venom gland can vary depending on age and gender. These findings suggest that hormonal and dietary influences are at play.

Assessing the effects of human-caused activities on marine mammals

Rising levels of noise in the ocean have been identified as a growing concern for the well-being of marine mammals, but other threats such as pollution, climate change, and prey depletion by fisheries may also harm marine mammals and influence their response to additional noise. Current knowledge and data are insufficient to determine what combination of factors cause the greatest concern, says a new report.

Uranium levels in deep sea coral reveal new insights into how the major northern...

Scientists examining naturally occurring uranium levels in ancient deep sea corals have discovered new insights into how the major northern ice sheets retreated during the last major deglaciation on Earth.

New species of Jurassic reptile

A new species of British ichthyosaur has been identified using skeletal remains which have been on display at the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences for many years.

State of the art maritime archaeology expedition conducted in Black Sea

An expedition mapping submerged ancient landscapes, the first of its kind in the Black Sea, is making exciting discoveries, report investigators.

Brewery wastewater transformed into energy storage

Engineers have developed an innovative bio-manufacturing process that uses a biological organism cultivated in brewery wastewater to create the carbon-based materials needed to make energy storage cells. This unique pairing of breweries and batteries could set up a win-win opportunity by reducing expensive wastewater treatment costs for beer makers while providing manufacturers with a more cost-effective means of creating renewable, naturally-derived fuel cell technologies.

High number of pesticides within colonies linked to honey bee deaths

Honey bee colonies in the United States have been dying at high rates for over a decade, and agricultural pesticides -- including fungicides, herbicides and insecticides -- are often implicated as major culprits. Until now, most scientific studies have looked at pesticides one at a time, rather than investigating the effects of multiple real-world pesticide exposures within a colony.

Ultimate sacrifice: Spider’s post-sex cannibalism aids offspring

The male dark fishing spider is just dying to father some children -- and this death wish probably evolved to benefit his offspring, according to new research.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa: The molecular tools of a bacterial survivor

The bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa can thrive in environments as different as the moist, warm tissue in our lungs, and the dry, nutrient-deprived surface of an office wall. Such adaptability makes it problematic in healthcare -- where it causes infections in cases of cystic fibrosis, cancer, HIV, and other immune-compromised conditions -- but also makes it a fascinating subject for study.

Shale gas, not EPA rules, has pushed decline in coal-generated electricity, study confirms

Cheap shale gas produced by fracking has driven the decline in coal production in the United States during the last decade, researchers have found.

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From 2011: The history of France’s Notre Dame Cathedral

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Capturing carbon, once a fringe idea, may be key to fighting climate change

Even if we end CO2 emissions by 2055, global temperatures could stay dangerously high for decades