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Monday, April 23, 2018

Solving a cell membrane mystery

Scientists have developed new fluorescent probes that prove the existence of cell membrane structures called ‘lipid rafts’, allowing researchers to study how toxins and viruses invade cells.

In-flight, on-demand hydrogen production could mean ‘greener’ aircraft

Technion researchers have a developed safe and efficient way to produce hydrogen on board a plane in flight. Using aluminum particles and (fresh or waste), the technology could one day help meet in-flight energy needs on commercial aircraft.

Thousands pay homage to millions who perished in the Holocaust

March of the Living is a somber memorial march from the original Auschwitz camp to Birkenau, a much larger death camp where Jews and Roma were murdered

Gut bacteria may turn common nutrient into clot-enhancing compound

Gut bacteria can produce a clot-enhancing compound when people eat a nutrient found in a variety of foods including meat, eggs and milk, according to new research.

USS Vinson nears Korean Peninsula

The Vinson battle group has been joined by Japanese destroyers and will soon be joined by South Korean ships, reports CBS News' David Martin

Man pleads not guilty to killing 3 family members with ax

Henri van Breda claims he tried to fight off a masked attacker, but he's accused of killing his parents and brother

Photosynthesis in the dark? Unraveling the mystery of algae evolution

Researchers compared the photosynthetic regulation in glaucophytes with that in cyanobacteria, to elucidate the changes caused by symbiosis in the interaction between photosynthetic electron transfer and other metabolic pathways. Their findings suggest that cyanelles of the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa retain many of the characteristics observed in their ancestral bacteria, and that C. paradoxa is the primary symbiotic algae most similar to cyanobacteria than other lineages of photosynthetic organisms in terms of metabolic interactions.

Novel method to detect toxic effects of chemicals could reduce need for animal testing

Traditional toxicological investigations performed on animals (in vivo) are expensive, time-consuming and may cause animal suffering. But new research demonstrates that a neuronal cell model, derived from mouse, can be used to evaluate the neurotoxic effect of chemicals. The alternative toxicity risk assessment could reduce reliance on animal testing while also enable quick large scale toxicity evaluations.

Climate change clues revealed by ice sheet collapse

The rapid decline of ancient ice sheets could help scientists predict the impact of modern-day climate and sea-level change, according to new research.

French election: Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen to fight for presidency

Centrist Emmanuel Macron will take on the far-right's Marine Le Pen in France's run-off election. Source: BBC

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Report: Facebook doesn’t curb hate speech in developing countries

"There's incitements to violence against entire communities and Facebook says it doesn't violate community standards," Center for Policy Alternatives says

Trump weighs in on Russia investigation, North Korea

President Trump spent the weekend at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida. He also had a busy weekend on Twitter, weighing in on a variety of subjects from the Russia investigation to North Korea. CBS News correspondent Errol Barnett reports.

“No sé qué hacemos aquí”, el podcast que cuenta la tragicomedia de dos inmigrantes...

Zona Pop conversa con Maiah Ocando y Gabriel Torrelles, la pareja venezolana detrás del proyecto bilingüe “No sé qué hacemos aquí”, o "We Don't Belong", en inglés. Fuente: Cnnenespanol.com