The frantic search for survivors continues in southwestern Japan after several days of rain set off deadly flooding.

Over the weekend, as much as three inches of rain fell per hour. Some regions reportedly received three times the usual precipitation for a normal July, setting off landslides and sending rivers surging over their banks.

At least 100 people have been killed, with many still unaccounted for. One man held up his mother as he told the story of finding his grandmother dead. He later learned his grandfather died too.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe canceled planned trips to Europe and the Middle East to oversee the emergency response. Abe dispatched 73,000 troops and emergency workers for the search and rescue efforts.

Meanwhile, evacuation orders remain in place for nearly 2 million people and another 2.3 million were advised to leave at one point.

While the worst of the rain has subsided, thousands remain without clean water and electricity. With temperatures expected to rise as high as 93 degrees, fears of heat-stroke are now a major concern in the already hard-hit communities.

Historic Heavy Rain And Landslides Hit Japan

Houses sit partially submerged in floodwater on July 9, 2018 in Kurashiki, Okayama, Japan.

Tomohiro Ohsumi / Getty Images

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