Roadmap for detecting changes in ocean due to climate change

When will we see significant changes in the ocean due to climate change? A new study finds that some changes are noticeable already, while others will take up to a century.

Humans migrated to Mongolia much earlier than previously believed

Stone tools uncovered in Mongolia by an international team of archaeologists indicate that modern humans traveled across the Eurasian steppe about 45,000 years ago.

Physiological mechanisms leading to enterovirus opening revealed

Enteroviruses are one of the most common human pathogens leading to high number of acute and chronic infections worldwide. The physiological events leading to successful enterovirus infection are still poorly understood. Researchers have found significant new information concerning the role of Albumin and ions in host cell vesicles that promote genome release and efficient infection.

From the tiny testes of flies, new insight into how genes arise

A common birthplace of new genes, the male testes are a hotspot for biological innovation. Within these organs, scientists have found a trove of virgin genetic sequences -- and a better understanding of how evolution moves forward.

Tiny GPS backpacks uncover the secret life of desert bats

A new study using miniaturized satellite-based tags revealed that during drier periods desert bats must fly further and longer to fulfill their nightly needs. According to researchers this signals their struggle in facing dry periods.

How E. coli knows how to cause the worst possible infection

The discovery could one day let doctors prevent the infection by allowing E. coli to pass harmlessly through the body.

Identification of genes responsible for sex-related differences in cancer aggressiveness

An understanding of the molecular basis of differences in the incidence and survival of cancer between men and women may allow the discovery of specific and more effective treatments. The study compares the brain tumours of male and female flies at the molecular level and identifies proteins responsible for the different degree of aggressiveness.

‘Invisible ink’ on antique Nile papyrus revealed by multiple methods

Researchers studied a small piece of papyrus that was excavated on the island of Elephantine on the River Nile a little over 100 years ago. The team used serval methods including non-destructive techniques at BESSY II.

Care of horses: Damage found in the bit area of most Finnish trotters

Damage was found in the part of the mouth affected by the bit in more than 80% of trotters examined after a race. However, such damage is easily overlooked due to being out of sight.

Unlocking the nanoscale world on standard biology lab equipment

Standard optical microscopes can image cells and bacteria but not their nanoscale features which are blurred by a physical effect called diffraction. Now, researchers report a simple way to bypass diffraction limitations using standard optical imaging tools.

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Migrants stranded off Italy rescued after 19 days at sea

Italy's interior minister banned migrant rescue vessels from docking in Italy

Cardinal George Pell loses appeal against sexual abuse convictions

By a two-to-one majority, the judges upheld Pell's sex abuse convictions. He is serving a six-year sentence.

NASA scientists tracking Greenland’s melting ice

President Trump has expressed interest in purchasing Greenland. But there is something he should know -- the real estate is melting. Seth Doane reports from Greenland.