Underwater ‘Cystoseira zosteroides’ forests, the Mediterranean algae, threatened by human activity impact

The effects of an intense storm every twenty-five years could make the marine alga populations of Cystoseira zosteroides disappear – an endemic species of the Mediterranean with great ecological value for the biodiversity of marine benthos – according to a new article.

Lipid receptor fosters infection of the uterus in bitches

In the female dog, cells of the uterus can accumulate lipid droplets to form so-called foamy epithelial cells during late metoestrus. These cells produce a hormone that is involved in the implantation of the embryo in the uterus. A team of researchers has now shown for the first time that the factor assisting the cells in lipid accumulation also facilitates the binding of bacteria to the epithelial cells, resulting in serious infections of the uterus in female dogs.

Al­tern­at­ive ox­i­dase from a mar­ine an­imal works in mam­mals, com­bats bac­terial sepsis

Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from a sea-squirt works as a safety valve for stressed mitochondria. This property enables it to stop the runaway inflammatory process that leads to multiple organ failure and eventual death in bacterial sepsis.

Long-term monitoring of sapovirus infection in wild carnivores in the Serengeti

Sapoviruses are an emerging group of viruses of the group of caliciviruses and well known agents of gastric enteritis, but very little is currently known about their role in wildlife ecology or the genetic strains that infect wildlife. Research findings by a group of scientists describe for the first time, sapovirus infection in African wild carnivores in the Serengeti ecosystem, including the spotted hyena, the African lion and the bat-eared fox. The results from two decades of monitoring revealed several sapovirus outbreaks of infection in spotted hyenas and, counter-intuitively, that the risk of infection declined as group sizes increased.

Resonance in Rainbow Bridge

Utah's iconic Rainbow Bridge hums with natural and human-made vibrations, according to a new study. The study characterizes the different ways the bridge vibrates and what frequencies and energy sources cause the rock structure to resonate. The vibrations are small, according to a geology and geophysics professor, but the study provides a baseline measure of the bridge's structural integrity and shows how human activities can rattle solid rock.

Fracking causes earthquakes, but new research finds way to make it safer

Injecting wastewater deep underground as a byproduct of oil and gas extraction techniques that include fracking causes human-made earthquakes, new research has found. The study, which also showed that the risk can be mitigated, has the potential to transform oil and gas industry practices.

Marriage made in sunlight: Invention merges solar with liquid battery

As solar cells produce a greater proportion of total electric power, a fundamental limitation remains: the dark of night when solar cells go to sleep. Lithium-ion batteries are too expensive a solution to use on something as massive as the electric grid. A professor of chemistry has a better idea: integrating the solar cell with a large-capacity battery.

Unique feeding habits of whales revealed

Whales are the biggest animals to ever have existed on Earth, and yet some subsist on creatures the size of a paper clip. It's a relatively common factoid, but, in truth, how they do this is only just being uncovered, thanks to new technologies.

Different tree species use the same genes to adapt to climate change, researchers find

Both pine and spruce use the same suite of 47 genes to adapt to geographic variation in temperature, and to appropriately time acquisition of cold hardiness -- a trait that allows plants to tolerate the adverse conditions of winter -- large-scale analysis has revealed.

Trophy hunting of lions can conserve the species, report suggests

Trophy hunters can play an important role in lion conservation, researchers have shown. These findings may surprise the public, but most lion conservationists think trophy hunting could play a key role in conserving this species because lions need large areas to thrive, and managing this land is expensive. The new work shows land under long-term management for trophy hunting can help fill this shortfall.

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Arquidiócesis de México crea grupo para erradicar los abusos sexuales “de raíz”

Se indicó que en estos momentos hay diez casos de sacerdotes acusados de pederastia que se vienen revisando en coordinación con autoridades civiles Fuente: Cnnenespanol.com

Fitch Rating baja su pronóstico de crecimiento económico para México en 2019

La agencia calificadora recortó a 1,6% su estimación del PIB para este año desde un previo de 2,1%, al tomar en cuenta la desaceleración de la economía nacional en el cuarto trimestre de 2018. Fuente: Cnnenespanol.com

Google rinde homenaje a Johann Sebastian Bach con su primer doodle impulsado por inteligencia...

Por primera vez, Google presenta un Doodle que, a través de inteligencia artificial, es capaz de crear armonías y "componer" una canción. Fuente: Cnnenespanol.com