Hexavalent chromium is widespread in North Carolina wells but not linked to coal ash

Hexavalent chromium, a carcinogen made famous by the movie Erin Brockovich, is far more abundant in drinking water wells in North Carolina than previously thought, a new study finds.

Mulberry extract activates brown fat, shows promise as obesity treatment

Good news for those who want to activate their brown fat (or BAT, brown adipose tissue) without having to be cold: New research suggests that a natural compound in mulberries, called "rutin," can activate the BAT in our bodies to increase metabolism and facilitate weight loss.

Entire Himalayan arc can produce large earthquakes

The main fault at the foot of the Himalayan mountains can likely generate destructive, major earthquakes along its entire 2,400-kilometer (1,500-mile) length, a new study finds. Combining historical documents with new geologic data, the study shows the previously unstudied portion of the fault in the country Bhutan is capable of producing a large earthquake and did so in 1714.

Scientists root for more cassava research to help meet greater demand for food

Global food demand is expected to grow by 110 per cent over the next 30 to 35 years, and for many of the poorest people on the planet, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, cassava is the most important source of calories. Cassava is also important as a crop that is resistant to climate change, but it has not received the same amount of attention as other staple food crops, say researchers.

Study reveals which genes are critical to a plant’s response to drought

Because plants cannot relocate when resources become scarce, they need to efficiently regulate their growth by responding to environmental cues. Drought is the most important cause of reduced plant growth and crop yield, which makes insights into a plant's drought response highly valuable to agriculture. A new study has provided major insights into how plants cope with water-limiting conditions, which can direct advanced breeding and genome engineering efforts to create high-performing, drought-tolerant crop plants.

Carpenter ants: When social instructions may be dangerous

Why do social beings sometimes put their own common sense aside to follow the lead of others, even though by doing so they could be brought to death's door? Research on carpenter ants is the first to show that so-called social information delivered by other ants often overrides an individual's assessment that a certain food source is toxic.

Accelerated glacier melting in West Antarctica documented

Two new studies have found the fastest ongoing rates of glacier retreat ever observed in West Antarctica and offer an unprecedented look at ice melting on the floating undersides of glaciers. The results highlight how the interaction between ocean conditions and the bedrock beneath a glacier can influence the frozen mass, helping scientists better predict future Antarctica ice loss and global sea level rise.

World’s largest study shows effects of long-term exposure to air pollution and traffic noise...

Long-term exposure to air pollution is linked to a greater incidence of high blood pressure, according to the largest study to investigate the effects of both air pollution and traffic noise by following over 41,000 people in five different countries for five to nine years.

EPA Announces National Call-to-Action to Change Out 300 Million Light Bulbs

WASHINGTON – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) marks Energy Star Day 2016 by calling on Americans to change out their inefficient light bulbs with Energy Star certified LED bulbs. Source: https://www.epa.gov/

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Trump administration plans on building global consensus after oil tanker attack

The Trump administration says the world must unite as it works to build a global consensus that Iran was behind Thursday's attacks on two oil tankers. So far, only Britain and Saudi Arabia are backing the case. Errol Barnett reports.

Hong Kong protesters flood the streets demanding city leader’s resignation

In Hong Kong, the outrage isn't letting up as some 2 million opponents hit the streets again Sunday demanding the city's leader resign for her support of an extradition bill that would send people to China to face trial and an uncertain future. Ramy Innocencio reports.

Hong Kong makes history as protesters denounce own government

Demonstrators called for the revocation of controversial extradition proposals​, the release of student demonstrators and the resignation of Chief Executive Carrie Lam